Industrial

Optical Gas Imaging

FLIR optical gas imaging (OGI) cameras can help you perform infrared gas detection, spotting methane, sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), hydrocarbon, and hundreds of other industrial gases quickly, accurately, and safely—without shutting down systems. With FLIR OGI cameras, you can scan broad sections of equipment rapidly and survey areas that are hard to reach with traditional contact measurement tools. OGI cameras can also detect leaks from a safe distance, displaying these invisible gases as clouds of smoke.

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See hydrocarbon gas leaks clearly

Scan thousands of connections for natural gas (methane) and other hydrocarbon leaks quickly and safely using FLIR G-Series cameras, avoiding regulatory violations, fines, and lost revenue.

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FLIR G-Series

Optical Gas Imaging (OGI) Cameras for Hydrocarbons

The NEXT GENERATION of Infrared Hydrocarbon Gas Detectors

Whether you need higher resolution—to see small leaks from a safe distance—or you are looking for a more cost-effective way to find invisible methane leaks, the latest gas detection cameras from FLIR offer the sensitivity and features you need to find leaks quickly and work safely. 

640 × 480 Optical Gas Imaging Camera

FLIR G620

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Gas Find IR Camera with LR Lens (7 to 8.5 microns)

FLIR GF77


FLIR received third-party validation of the FLIR GF-Series and G-Series cameras' compliance with the following sensitivity standards.


For the NSPS OOOOa and OOOOb methane rules LAID OUT BY EPA:

Your optical gas imaging equipment must be capable of imaging a gas that is half methane, half propane at a concentration of 10,000 ppm at a flow rate of ≤60 g/hr from a quarter inch diameter orifice.


For Appendix K to 40 CFR Part 60:

Your optical gas imaging equipment must be capable of detecting methane emissions at a rate of 19 g/hr, detecting either n-butane emissions at 29 g/hr or propane emissions at 22 g/hr, and performing at a viewing distance of 2 meters with a delta-T of 5°C in calm wind conditions (≤1 meter/second).

EPA OOOOa & OOOOB and Appendix K Certificate     FLIR OGI Operating Envelope Report

OGI and OOOOa Training Course

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Find SF6 gas leaks easily

FLIR G306 cameras can examine substation circuit breakers for sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) leaks at a safe distance from high-voltage areas, without the need to shut down operations.

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FLIR G306

Optical Gas Imaging (OGI) Camera for Sulfur Hexafluoride (SF₆)

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Find leaks at steel plants

FLIR G346 cameras help protect workers and the environment from toxic levels of carbon monoxide (CO) by performing infrared gas detection quickly and efficiently.

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FLIR G346

Optical Gas Imaging (OGI) Camera for Carbon Monoxide (CO)

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Detect leaks from hydrogen-cooled generators

Imaging the tracer gas, CO2, with a G343 OGI camera allows operators of hydrogen-cooled generators to efficiently find hydrogen leaks.

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FLIR G343

Optical Gas Imaging (OGI) Camera for Carbon Dioxide (CO₂)

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Detect R-124 compressor leaks

Employing FLIR G304's infrared technology allows for early detection of gas leaks. It can help avoid interruptions in operations, prevent the loss of perishable products, and limit the environmental impact of toxic refrigerants.

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FLIR G304

Optical Gas Imaging Camera for Hydrofluorocarbons

OGI Resources
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FLIR GF3xx QuickStart Tutorial
FLIR GF3xx QuickStart Tutorial

Watch this tutorial for an overview of the basic infrared camera functions, including what comes in the case, how to make simple adjustments and capture thermal images.

Noise Equivalent Concentration Length: The New Standard for Optical Gas Imaging
Noise Equivalent Concentration Length: The New Standard for Optical Gas Imaging

Noise Equivalent Concentration Length: The New Standard for Optical Gas Imaging

Using Optical Gas Imaging to Comply with OOOOa Regulations: A Case Study
Using Optical Gas Imaging to Comply with OOOOa Regulations: A Case Study

Using Optical Gas Imaging to Comply with OOOOa Regulations: A Case Study